Category Archives: bamboo steamer

Retaining vitamins – how a bamboo steamer helps

retaining vitamins with a bamboo steamerBoiling vegetables saps their nutrition. As does frying.

A better way is to steam. I prefer the bamboo steamer because it is more natural. The round-shaped two-tier basket sits snugly in your wok or rounded-edge fry pan. You bring the water to boil in the bottom and the hot vapor filters through the bamboo weave to caressingly cook, not torch nor drown, the natural goodness pulled from the earth. No butter, no oils, no fats are needed to bring them to tender and crisp perfection.

If we’ve learned anything in recent decades, it’s that processes bleach nutrition from the food. Early food scientists actually re-injected chemical nutrients into food (bleached white flour, for example) and thus “fortified” the food. Well, the early optimism about that option has fizzled. Now the focus is on less processes for healthier food to retain vitamins. But have you thought about your home?

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My fav Chinese broccoli

chinesebroccoliSince marrying a Chinese girl, I have come to know and love many Chinese dishes, but none compares to the Chinese broccoli drizzled in hoisin or oyster sauce. There’s nothing better to get your dark greens packed with vitamins and roughage so important for cancer-free colon. Here’s a recipe from Free Recipe Network.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch Gai Lan (Chinese broccoli), trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger root
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil.
  2. Add the Chinese broccoli and cook uncovered until just tender, about 4 minutes, or steam the Chinese broccoli in a bamboo steamer for 3 minutes.
  3. Drain and set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, whisk the sugar, cornstarch, soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, hoisin sauce, ginger, and garlic together in a small saucepan over medium heat until thickened and no longer cloudy, 5 to 7 minutes.
  5. Toss the broccoli in the sauce and serve.
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The last remaining bamboo steamer maker in Hong Kong — Vincent Wong

It was a humid day. The moist air nourished everything. An overlooked store, located in the middle of Western Street in the district of Sai Ying Pun, is so low-profile that seems unlikely that it has been surviving through furious storms over the past decades. Its name is Tak Chong Sum Kee Bamboo Steamer Company. […]

via The last remaining bamboo steamer maker in Hong Kong — Vincent Wong

Trying is believing: https://www.amazon.com/Cuisine-Natural-Non-Toxic-Construction-Dumpling/dp/B07H9YCH5H/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1547687618&sr=8-8&keywords=10+inch+bamboo+steamer

Advantage of steaming fish

steamed fishHonestly, I was initially put off by steamed fish, but that was mostly because of some unfortunate words.

You see, my in-laws criticized the restaurant I had invited them to. It was my favorite fish food place, and they offered grilled filets.

My father-in-law was perhaps a tad too sincere: “It’s kind of tough.”

So his rejection of my favorite food closed me off to his favorite food.

The years have rolled by. I’ve lost my prejudices. I can now taste steamed fish objectively, untainted by rejection-association. And I must say, my father-in-law was right: It’s tender.

The Bible says we need to tell the truth in love, and there are some “truths” that are better left unsaid. Instead of convincing people, we close them off entirely.

Fish is my favorite food. It’s pure protein (I’m trying to build muscle). It doesn’t have cholesterol. Some actually lowers your cholesterol. It doesn’t have increase your risk for hypertension.

I’ll eat grilled filets still because I’m not against them being “tough.” But I do relish a Chinese steamed fish!

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Steaming and submersion cooking — Khushbu Singhal

I’ve launched into bamboo steamer business. I’m into healthy food and exercise, so this is perfect for me. Here are observations of an expert: Moist heat techniques – steaming, cooking en papillote, shallow poaching, deep poaching and simmering are liquid and or water vapor based cooking. Steaming Cooking is done by water vapor in a closed vessel. Steamed foods don’t lose much of their color. This method doesn’t impart their own flavor as the frying or roasting does. So […]

via Steaming and submersion cooking — Khushbu Singhal

Steamed ginger fish

steamed-fish-with-gingerIngredients:

  • 2 tablespoons coconut cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 /2 tablespoons ginger, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon garlic
  • 2 white fish, (use fillets), around 110 grams each
  • 1 cup leeks
  • 1/4 cup tomatoes, sliced
  • 1/4 cup broccoli, small florets
  • 1 cup baby carrots, sliced in half lengthwise

How to Cook Ginger Fish
Blend together apple or coconut cider vinegar, light soy sauce , sesame oil, chopped ginger, and chopped garlic in a large bowl; set aside.

Combine white fish fillets, chopped leeks, sliced tomatoes, broccoli florets, and baby carrots; toss in the dressing until evenly coated. Divide into 2 equal portions. Wrap each portion of the fish and vegetables in a wax liner and steam in 10-inch bamboo steamer for 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit to cool before opening.

Editor’s note: Of course, I salivate over the enticing posts of many of my foodie blogs that I subscribe to (and that reciprocally subscribe to me). Now I am joining the throng with my own recipe I found that works.

Adopted from Yummy.ph