Category Archives: cooking

The 3 unhealthiest dim sum

pexels-photo-1005374There’s a urban legend among the Chinese that the tea washes away all the excesses of Dim Sum. They call it a cleanse or a detergent.

The truth of the matter is that Dim Sum is a comfort food (Dim Sum means “touches your heart”), like seven-layer dip with potato chips or shoe fly pie. Indulging shouldn’t be a daily or even weekly experience.

Here are the three Dim Sum you should avoid — or if it’s absolutely you’re favorite, cut back on the intake per category on other baskets you order!

Three Dim Sum items to avoid:

  1. Chinese Pork Ribs: High calories

In terms of caloric intake for a single portion, nothing beats the Chinese pork ribs with sticky rice in black bean sauce. In 2005, the Public Health Branch of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department of Hong Kong analyzed 71 Dim Sum items and found that a portion of this tasty treat has a whopping 820 calories. And that was for a serving size of 100 grams — about half a cup (rice and beef). Who eats only a half a cup of this deliciousness?

The average adult needs between 2,000 and 2,500 calories a day. One “portion” of this yummy food then is about one-third of your daily need for caloric energy. (If you don’t use up that energy, it gets stored as fat.)

2. Xiao Long Bao Soup: Too much fat

In the area of fat, there are many contenders. But the king is Xiao Long Bao Soup Dumpling with a staggering 80 grams of fat, according to My Fitness Pal’s ranking. These jellied meats inside of a flour dough wrapping are so bad that Men’s Health magazine in Singapore called on readers to “dump the dumpling.” Read the rest of unhealthiest dim sum.

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Simple steamed fish Chinese style

simple steamed chinese fish filetsIngredients for 4 servings:

  • About 2 lbs white fish fillets
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 3 pinches sugar
  • 2 green onions, cut into slivers
  • 3 TB cilantro
  • 1 clove garlic crushed
  • 1 TB fresh ginger crushed
  • 2 TB cooking oil
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 3 TB soy sauce

Marinade ingredients:

  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp sugar
  • 1 TB sherry
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger cut into slivers

Visit our website for directions to Simple steamed fish Chinese style.

Nuts and bolts post of bamboo steamers

dimsumBamboo steamers are all the rage for a reason. It turns out that the ancient Chinese knew a thing or two about keeping nutrients and flavor in their ingredients. The double-tier bamboo basket provides the additional benefit of allowing flavors to inter-mingle. But you can amp up your flavor by boiling broth in the bottom water!

Once you have your bamboo steamer from China, here’s the simple steps that are absolutely necessary for best results:

  • Line the bottom with lettuce or cabbage leaves. Alternatively, you can buy special wax paper liners that are easy to use. This step is important because the cooking food will otherwise stick to the bamboo slats that comprise the steamer and make a sticky mess. You can put your fish on the bottom tier and vegetables on the top one.
  • Place the interlocking tiers into a wok or other pot with approximately two inches of water. Make sure the level of the food doesn’t submerge in the water or you will have boiled food! Simmer on low heat for the allotted time. Make sure the water doesn’t boil off.
  • Serve and enjoy piping hot over rice!
  • Clean the bamboo steamer with a soft dish soap, never in the dishwasher. Make sure it is thoroughly dry before storing in the cupboard. The same bamboo that makes for healthy and natural food is also delicate and susceptible to mold!
  • The wok works best for the bamboo steamers, but an open skillet will work. Make sure the bamboo ring on the bottom is slightly submerged in the water to avoid burning (including slow burn).

cuisine natural bamboo steamerThese bamboo cooking baskets require a bit of learning curve, but once you get used to them, it’s easy to get addicted. The flavor and texture is superior to boiled vegetables! The fish comes out tender with no blackened burn marks or greasy oil! Read the rest of how-to-use bamboo steamers.

Step up your steaming game

asian-food-deliciousFor those who are looking to level up their kitchen skills, a bamboo steamer offers a more natural way to steam fish and vegetables — and it’s not just for Chinese cooking. Steaming conserves nutrients better than most other types of cooking. Of course, it reduces fat content because no oil is needed to keep the food from sticking to the pan.

I’m going to be honest: The bamboo steamer sounded pretty exotic to me, and I imagined it would more difficult to use. What I found was that it really isn’t difficult. Here’s the down and dirty truth: Because I’m addicted to “fast cooking,” I used to throw frozen fish sticks into the toaster oven. They took about 6 minutes. Now I place refrigerated fillets on Napa cabbage leaves in my steamer. It takes about 6 minutes.

The kicker: I’m moving away from processed food.

This is a huge bonus because prepared and package convenient food means “processed.” Every time you eat processed food, you’re taking a hit of salt, sugar and fat.

bamboo steamer with a bowl inside

You can use a bowl to keep the food from sticking to the bamboo. I prefer the Napa cabbage.

My favorite brand of fish sticks said on the label “lightly processed,” so I thought I was doing well. Then I checked the sodium content, and guess what: it was high. Salt is used to cover up a lot of mishaps in the processed food industry. It gets added to create craving and hook repeat customers. You don’t even realize it’s there, but it’s pulling you back to another purchase.

When I steam, I control the amount of salt, which is creating a heart disease epidemic in the United States.

the end of the fish stick

The end of the frozen fish stick

One more thing: washing. Is cleaning the bamboo steamer more difficult than the toaster over tray. I used to soak the toaster oven tray in water with dish soap and then scrub it with stainless steel scouring pad. It took a tool on my sensitive skin.

Now I use a soap-saturated sponge on the bamboo steamer, rinse thoroughly and let dry. The drying is the tricky point on the bamboo steamer. It has to dry thoroughly or mold or mildew and grow. I have found that if you leave the top off and store it on an open shelf after drying, it’s good.

The net time for cleaning? The bamboo steamer is quicker and easier.

This is my experience with the bamboo steamer. Why don’t you tell me your yours in the comments?

Would you like to buy a 10-inch bamboo steamer? I’m selling to supplement my ministry.

How to use a bamboo steamer?

how to use a bamboo steamerBamboo steamers are all the rage for a reason. It turns out that the ancient Chinese knew a thing or two about keeping nutrients and flavor in their ingredients. The double-tier bamboo basket provides the additional benefit of allowing flavors to inter-mingle. But you can amp up your flavor by boiling broth in the bottom water!

Once you have your bamboo steamer from China, here’s the simple steps that are absolutely necessary for best results:

  • Line the bottom with lettuce or cabbage leaves. Alternatively, you can buy special wax paper liners that are easy to use. This step is important because the cooking food will otherwise stick to the bamboo slats that comprise the steamer and make a sticky mess. You can put your fish on the bottom tier and vegetables on the top one.
  • Place the interlocking tiers into a wok or other pot with approximately two inches of water. Make sure the level of the food doesn’t submerge in the water or you will have boiled food! Simmer on low heat for the allotted time. Make sure the water doesn’t boil off.
  • Serve and enjoy piping hot over rice!
  • Clean the bamboo steamer with a soft dish soap, never in the dishwasher. Make sure it is thoroughly dry before storing in the cupboard. The same bamboo that makes for healthy and natural food is also delicate and susceptible to mold!
  • The wok works best for the bamboo steamers, but an open skillet will work. Make sure the bamboo ring on the bottom is slightly submerged in the water to avoid burning (including slow burn).

These bamboo cooking baskets require a bit of learning curve, but once you get used to them, it’s easy to get addicted. The flavor and texture is superior to boiled vegetables! The fish comes out tender with no blackened burn marks or greasy oil Read more about how to use a bamboo steamer? 

My fav Chinese broccoli

chinesebroccoliSince marrying a Chinese girl, I have come to know and love many Chinese dishes, but none compares to the Chinese broccoli drizzled in hoisin or oyster sauce. There’s nothing better to get your dark greens packed with vitamins and roughage so important for cancer-free colon. Here’s a recipe from Free Recipe Network.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch Gai Lan (Chinese broccoli), trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger root
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil.
  2. Add the Chinese broccoli and cook uncovered until just tender, about 4 minutes, or steam the Chinese broccoli in a bamboo steamer for 3 minutes.
  3. Drain and set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, whisk the sugar, cornstarch, soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, hoisin sauce, ginger, and garlic together in a small saucepan over medium heat until thickened and no longer cloudy, 5 to 7 minutes.
  5. Toss the broccoli in the sauce and serve.
Quote

The last remaining bamboo steamer maker in Hong Kong — Vincent Wong

It was a humid day. The moist air nourished everything. An overlooked store, located in the middle of Western Street in the district of Sai Ying Pun, is so low-profile that seems unlikely that it has been surviving through furious storms over the past decades. Its name is Tak Chong Sum Kee Bamboo Steamer Company. […]

via The last remaining bamboo steamer maker in Hong Kong — Vincent Wong

Trying is believing: https://www.amazon.com/Cuisine-Natural-Non-Toxic-Construction-Dumpling/dp/B07H9YCH5H/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1547687618&sr=8-8&keywords=10+inch+bamboo+steamer

Quote

Steaming and submersion cooking — Khushbu Singhal

I’ve launched into bamboo steamer business. I’m into healthy food and exercise, so this is perfect for me. Here are observations of an expert: Moist heat techniques – steaming, cooking en papillote, shallow poaching, deep poaching and simmering are liquid and or water vapor based cooking. Steaming Cooking is done by water vapor in a closed vessel. Steamed foods don’t lose much of their color. This method doesn’t impart their own flavor as the frying or roasting does. So […]

via Steaming and submersion cooking — Khushbu Singhal

Steamed ginger fish

steamed-fish-with-gingerIngredients:

  • 2 tablespoons coconut cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 /2 tablespoons ginger, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon garlic
  • 2 white fish, (use fillets), around 110 grams each
  • 1 cup leeks
  • 1/4 cup tomatoes, sliced
  • 1/4 cup broccoli, small florets
  • 1 cup baby carrots, sliced in half lengthwise

How to Cook Ginger Fish
Blend together apple or coconut cider vinegar, light soy sauce , sesame oil, chopped ginger, and chopped garlic in a large bowl; set aside.

Combine white fish fillets, chopped leeks, sliced tomatoes, broccoli florets, and baby carrots; toss in the dressing until evenly coated. Divide into 2 equal portions. Wrap each portion of the fish and vegetables in a wax liner and steam in 10-inch bamboo steamer for 25 to 30 minutes. Let sit to cool before opening.

Editor’s note: Of course, I salivate over the enticing posts of many of my foodie blogs that I subscribe to (and that reciprocally subscribe to me). Now I am joining the throng with my own recipe I found that works.

Adopted from Yummy.ph