Tag Archives: Nazism

From behind the wall

Anne Frank hid with her family in Nazi-occupied Netherlands for two years. She wrote a diary which has resonated worldwide since publication after her death in a concentration camp. It’s impressive to see how a world can be impacted from seclusion.

Anne Frank’s story is one of optimism. It is one of inauspicious work changing a world. Did she realize the greatness of what she was doing? Did she realize the extent of her reach?

The parallels with a prayer warrior are noteworthy. Your labors go unnoticed but impact the entire world. Prayer requires optimism. You may not realize the extent of your reach.

Pray, pray, pray. Prayer is never a waste of time. Doing other things may be a waste of time. It’s ironic that we try to do so much. If we would only pray, God would do so much. He is able to do much! We are incapable of doing much. Much of our best efforts are frustrated. It might be good for you to DO less and PRAY more.

When I was a missionary in Guatemala, after years of running myself ragged in activities, I put the brakes on. Tired, I tried prayer. Not that I wasn’t praying before, but I started praying more. More time, higher quality, greater intensity, in prayer. Get behind the wall, where the real work will be done.

Unless the LORD builds the house, its builders labor in vain. Unless the LORD watches over the city, the watchmen stand guard in vain. — Psm 127:1 NIV

He refused to escape

Repeated times, friends urged Janusz Korczak  to escape before the Nazis deported him to a death camp. As an internationally famous author and intellectual, the Jewish pediatrician, head of a Warsaw orphanage, would get special treatment — if he wanted it.

But Janusz determined to stay with his charges, 192 Jewish orphans. When Nazis deported them to the Treblinka extermination camp, Janusz lied to the tykes. He told them to wear their finest clothes because they were going on a field trip. They filed out in pairs that August day of 1942. At the head, according to one observer, one kid played a violin. At the tail, Janusz carried a couple of the younger kids who were not so able to walk. They ignored their fate because Janusz didn´t want them to suffer crying.

For the kids, there was no hope. But Janusz could have saved himself. Urban legend holds it that an SS officer, who loved Janusz´s children´s book, urged him to flee to freedom. He refused. He would stay with his kids to the end — and die with them. This year, 2012, is 100 years since he opened his orphanage.

Janusz — for his kids — paid the ultimate price. What are you UNwilling to do — for God?